If you think you’re the only one facing obstacles, you’re not. Below are some solutions for common problems.

“I don’t know how to apply to college, or even where I want to go.”

Confusion

You’re not alone. No whining! If you are in high school, start by talking to your guidance counselor. If you are out of high school, talk to someone you know who’s gone to college. Talk to anyone who will listen. Head over to the Take Action section of this site and explore your options. There’s a lot of good advice available, but you have to spend some time on it. Make it fun, like shopping for a new life.

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“I already have a job so I’m good.”

Confusion

Good for you. That's today. If you are in your late teens or early 20s and doing something fun like say, bartending, you may have plenty of cash. Big whoop. Read this: Over a lifetime, college graduates earn 75 percent more than non-college graduates. A college degree is going to be essential to your long-term financial picture—you won't be tending bar when you’re 50. Trust us. In 2008, the average annual income for those with a college degree was $45,000, but people with a high school degree made only $25K.* You do the math. *According to the National Center for Education Statistics

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“I have a bunch of questions and I don’t know who to ask.”

Confusion

All schools have counselors who can help you navigate the admissions and enrollment process. It's what they do. Find the general contact info for a school (their website is a good place to start) and ask to speak with an admissions counselor. They're in the business of helping, and they want you to find a way.

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“I don’t know anything about higher education. It just feels too overwhelming.”

Confusion

That's cool. No one does at the beginning. You're at the right place. There’s a clear way forward. You can do it. This site will give you the info you need to know what to do, when to do it and where to go next. Don’t give up.

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“No one else in my family has ever gone to college, so I don’t need to.”

Confusion

After high school, you may have 40 or 50 years of employment ahead. Many jobs will change. Some won't even be around. Others will be in demand. Higher education will give you more options. Many careers which require only a high school diploma today may not exist in a few years. Here's another reason: Your family will be proud of you. 

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